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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 84 (some duplicates have been removed)
of life and almost five million barrels of oil that into the gulf. darren gersh reports. >> reporter: justice department officials hope today's settlement and criminal pleas will bring justice to the families of the men who died when the "deepwater horizon" exploded. >> perhaps the greatest tragedy is that the deaths of the 11 men on board the "deepwater horizon" could have been avoided. the explosion of the rig was a disaster that resulted from b.p.'s culture of privileging profit over prudence. >> reporter: b.p. has agreed to plead guilty to 11 counts of felony manslaughter and one felony count of lying to congress. in addition, two b.p. supervisors on the deepwater rig have been charged with 23 counts of manslaughter. another b.p. executive was charged with lying to congress. b.p. will also pay a record- setting $4 billion in criminal fines and penalties. thrown in with the criminal charges is a civil settlement with the securities and exchange commission. b.p. will pay more than half a billion llars to stle charges it lied to investors, telling them the macondo spill was one-tent
darren gersh recently spoke with economists from both sides of the aisle. dean baker and douglas holtz- eakin joined us and after a coin toss, darren started with dean asking him whether it's good policy for the president to insist tax rates should go up for high income americans. >> well, we are going to need higher tax revenue at some point. i think this is, you know, a good way to get it. i mean, this is the politics not the policy. we will need higher tax revenue. where are you going to get it from? the people who have the money. can you get it other ways? sure. but it seems to me you can get the money. when you have an opportunity to raise a good chunk of revenue by not doing something, i think i take tha you could negotiate. if they decide they want comprehensive tax reform like they did in '86, you can do that after january 1. >> is the president right to stick on this point? is it substantive or political? >> i think it's political. you need tax revenue. you want to get it with the lowest rate you can. that's a good rule of thumb for economic policy. even if he wants the revenu
is right at the top. darren gersh reports. >> reporter: it was freshman welcome day in washington. senate republican leader mitch mcconnell lost ground in the election, but he posed for the cameras with the three new senators who will be joining his side of the aisle in january. in the house, minority leader nancy pelosi beamed as she presented the new faces adding to democratic ranks in the coming congress. given what awaits these new lawmakers in january, you might wonder why they want the job. it's still not clear whether a lame duck session of congress will navigate the expiring tax breaks and automatic spending cuts that make up the fiscal cliff. the president met privately with labor leaders to discuss options for the fiscal cliff. tomorrow, he will caucus with c.e.o.s from companies like wal-mart, g.e. and bank of america. it all leads up to friday when the president sits down with congressional leaders at the white house to begin the real negotiations, and both sides enter those talks claiming a mandate to protect the principals the voters endorsed at the ballot box. >> darren ger
-opening but getting the northeast moving again faces a long road ahead. darren gersh reports. >> reporter: at sandy's peak, flooding covered the runways at new york's laguardia airport. as the waters recede, f.a.a. tenicians are repairing landing lights and navigational systems. and airlines hope ts y will be able to offer limited service at laguardia tomorrow. in washington, boston, newark, and new york's john f. kennedy, airport operations are returning to normal. flightaware estimates 2,800 flights were canceled today, down from a peak of almost 8,000 on monday. tomorrow, 530 flights have been officially scrapped, but that will grow, if as seems likely, laguardia has trouble opening tomorrow. add it up and airlines took a big hit from sandy. >> you can multiply 18,000 canceled flights by a few tens of thousands of dollars in revenue per flight and you're well north of $100 million in lost revenue. some of it they will be able to recover by flying flightmore full over the next week, but a lot of it is gone. >> reporter: if it rolls on the ground, recovery will take longer.mo amtrak is providing
overhauls how it calculates the number by including more companies in its survey. darren gersh reports. >> reporter: the economic signals out today point in the same direction-- an economy that has moved through a rough couple of months last spring has now found stability. >> slow growth need not be fragile, so we are in a moderate growth phase that appears to be quite durable. it's going to be hard to break out significantly in one direction or the other, unless we get a policy surprise or a policy mistake. >> reporter: the adp payroll snapshot is seen as a kind of preview for the government's official employment report, which comes out tomorrow. factoring in job losses in state and local government, adp projects the labor department will likely say the economy created roughly 130,000 jobs in october. barclays ecomist chael gapen expects the unemployment rate will hold steady tomorrow at 7.8%. and gapen expects the pattern of moderate job gains over the last year will be the pattern for the coming year, too. >> 150,000 to 160,000 jobs a month may not be a bang-out kind of number that
.9%. darren gersh has the story from washington d.c. >> reporter: the october employment report makes it clear a jobs recovery is solidly underway. >> i think the k message tre is that employment growth has been taken up a notch. over the last three months we've added over 170,000 jobs on average. that's a little bit better than what we've been seeing. that is enough over the long haul to bring the unemployment rate down, but slowly. >> reporter: one of the best things about this jobs report: payroll gains were broad-based. retailing added 36,000 jobs. health care 31,000 jobs. construction 17,000 jobs. manufacturing shook off its recent losses, adding 13,000 jobs. the unemployment rate did tick up to 7.9%. but even that may be a sign of strength. labor force participation had been falling as older workers retired and others gave up looking for work. over the last two months that trend has reversed and labor force participation is at its highest level in three years. >> that's a very good sign because it means job opportunities are increasing. it's drawing people in. >> reporter: wage growth wa
for either side. darren gersh reports. >> reporter: unless all those polls are wrong and tomorrow brings a big surprise one way or another, this election will be the remembered as one of the closest in history. it could also end with both parties convinced the folks back home don't want them to compromise on key issues like taxes and fairness and the size of government. >> there is going to be enough room for both sides to claim that they have the mantle from the american public or that nobody does and i think that hurts the issues on the fiscal cliff. >> reporter: if the president prevails tomorrow, he will be one of the only incumbents to win re-election with fewer votes than he got in his first campaign for the white house. if romney wins, it's possible democrats will keep control of the senate. either way, the winner's claim to a mandate will look very thin this year. and that will make it hard to move forward with a clear agenda. the numbers won't justify that. they will suggest that you will have to deal with the other side because a lot of people didn't vote for you and they're pa
solution. but as darren gersh reports, both sides are still trying to figure out the message of the election, and may be reluctant to compromise for now. >> reporter: the voters have spoken and house speaker john boehner says he has gotten the message. >> because the american people expect us to find common ground, we're willing to accept some additional revenues via tax reform. there's a model for tax reform that supports economic growth. >> reporter: does that mean house republicans are now willing to accept higher taxes on those making more than $250,000? not exactly. boehner says he will only raise more money from taxes under what he called the right conditions. >> does the increased revenue come from government taking a larger share of what the american people earn through higher tax rates? or does it come as a bi-product of growing our economy, energized by a simpler cleaner fairer tax code with fewer loopholes and lower rates for all. >> reporter: democratic senate leader harry reid also says he wants a quick fix for the fiscal cliff. but, he was clearly feeling empowe
will love. darren gersh, "n.b.r.," washington. >> tom: it wasn't as bad as we thought. that's how the government sized up the summer drought which parched the midwest. a report out today says crops fared better than expected. still u.s. farmers probably produced their smallest corn crop in six years. and as diane eastabrook reports uncertainty over the weather could keep prices volatile for months. >> reporter: this morning chicago grain traders sent soybean futures prices tumbling and corn prices see-sawing on the latest news about this year's harvest. the department of agriculture forecast farmers will produce slightly more soybeans and corn than predicted a month ago. >> it did come in a little better than expected and that goes to the technology that we've been able to develop-- that our scientists have been able to put into seeds. >> reporter: still the summer drought was devastating. the government expects the u.s. corn crop will be about 13% smaller than last year's and the soybean crop could be about 4% smaller. scoville also worries the weather problems that plagued the u
with republican leaders get underway to avoid the fiscal cliff. as darren gersh reports from washington, even before republicans and democrats sit down to talk on friday, both sides are laying down markers. >> reporter: just two days before he meets with congressional leaders, the president took a tougher tone on budget talks. in his news conference, he pushed hard for an immediate extension of tax cuts for everyone making less than $250,000 a year. >> and by the way, that means every american, inuding the wealthiest americans get a tax cut. it means that 98% of all americans, and 97% of all small businesses won't see their taxes go up a single dime. the senate has already passed a law like this. democrats in the house are ready to pass a law like this and i hope republicans in the house come on board too. >> reporter: republicans said again they would be willing to raise more tax revenue by closing loopholes or limiting deductions. but those revenues had to be matched with cuts in entitlement programs. >> until u ma our entitlement programs fit the future demographic of country, the demograp
increases from tanking the economy at the first of the year. but as darren gersh reports, what we are not yet clear about is whether either side is willing to give up enough to get the job done. >> reporter: in washington, they think carefully about the pictures they want to present to the public so this mattered. all four congressional leaders-- democrats and republicans-- after meeting with the president chose to face the cameras together. that hardly ever happens and it reflects the new post-election mood of cooperation. house speaker john boehner called the meeting very constructive. >> i outlined a framework that deals with reforming our tax code and reforming our spending. and i believe the framework that i've outlined in our meeting today is consistent with the president's call for a fair and balanced approach. >> reporter: to republican leaders balance means some higher tax revenues are paired with reductions in spending and changes in entitlement programs. that's a challenge for democrats, but the president seemed willing to move in that direction. >> our challenge is to
, including entitlement reform. darren gersh explains. >> reporter: the big money in entitlements is in health care, and that means any grand bargain to avoid the fiscal cliff will slice away aone of the nation's most popular programs. >> medicare is clearly in the gunsights. >> reporter: it's possible congress and the president could agree to save $300 to $400 billion from medicare by cutting fees for doctors and hospitals. but analysts worry slashing payments won't make the health care system more efficient. >> this is not really a way to structurally change medicare and if you don't change the underlying incentives, you don't get long-term savings. >> reporter: progressives at the center for american progress say the government could save close to $150 billion by squeezing the prices the government pays for drugs. but many of the president's allies reject the idea of aggressively raising co-payments for patients. and they also consider benefits based on a patient's financial situation a risky idea. >> if people want to ask the wealthy to pay more, the time to ask them to pay more is when th
be on the table right now or not, and the disagreement is sharpest over social security. darren gersh takes a look at why. >> reporter: the number-two man in the senate democratic leadership argues any fix for social security's finances should come after the immediate challenge is out of the way. >> i think we should take social security off the table for the current fiscal cliff and deficit discussion, but be very honest about what we're going to achieve in the near term. >> reporter: republicans pushed back, arguing social security is part of the deficit problem because it is no longer taking in enough in taxes to cover the benefits it pays out. social security makes up the difference by cashing in special treasury bonds it holds in its trust fund. but conservatives point out the money to redeem those bonds comes from taxpayers. >> it is money that is coming out of general revenue that is going into social security that reduces the amount of revenue that is available for everything from aircraft carriers and roads to environmental issues. >> reporter: legally, social security is off-budget, mean
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 84 (some duplicates have been removed)

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